Community Manager (Information Technology)

Bio

  • Passport: Japan
  • Languages: Japanese, English, conversational Korean
  • School: Yokohama International School (Yokohama, Japan)
  • College: Smith College (Massachussets, USA)
  • Company: currently at Google Japan (Tokyo, Japan)

Career profile

I work at Google as a Community Manager (CM). CMs are quite rare in Japan, although it is a widely known profession in foreign countries, especially in the United States. My focus is on consumer users (ie. users who use our free products, and not clients who pay to use gSuite), specifically in Japan and Korea, for over 7 Google products that include but not limited to Gmail/Inbox, Google Maps, Google Photos, Google Chrome, etc.

As a CM, my job is to

  • manage a program called the Top Contributor Program for Japan
  • teach users how to use our products more effectively
    • introducing through Twitter, Google’s official forums, and sometimes YouTube
  • get together with the engineers who build the product and talk about user pain points, features that users love, and what our next launch should look like
  • host events to give talks and participate in panel discussions about Google’s products and programs

My typical day is pretty different from a lot of my colleagues. Although it’s favorable to disconnect work and personal life, for me, work is part of my personal life, so everything is a mishmash. Checking my work email during my vacation is not stressful for me, but rather, something very natural that I enjoy; not saying this is good, as in most cases it’s better to be offline while on vacation, but it’s just the way I personally feel most comfortable with.

To give you a glimpse of my day, here’s my timetable for an average Wednesday:

  • 4:30 am – Wake up. I’m a very early riser. Still in bed, I reach for my phone and tap through my work emails. I mark things like “to-do for today,” “read later,” and “can ignore,” so I can have an idea of how my day will be like. I then continue to work for an hour or two.
  • 6:00 am – I’m a gamer, so I’m usually playing video games at home. I occasionally make breakfast when I’m hungry.
  • 10:30 am – Arrive at the office. Get tasks done, join meetings, and check-in with my report (side note: I dislike the phrase “work under me” or in Japanese “部下 (buka)”. It sounds too authoritative in a very liberal environment like Google).
  • 12:00 pm – Lunch. Meetings. Work.
  • 2:00 pm – Leave the office to get some quick chores done, like paying bills and running to the bank.
  • 3:00 pm – Deliver a talk to middle school students for Mind the Gap. This is program to get female students interested in the world of computer science and programming, and we have schools visit the office for a tour, a panel discussion, Q&A, and a programming workshop.
  • 5:00 pm – Meeting. Leave the office. Do whatever I need to do.
  • 10:00 pm – At home, I work for another hour or so.

I generally work with my colleagues in the US and in Europe, so to make up for the time zone difference, I work early morning (when US is awake), and late night (when Europe is awake). To make up for it, my afternoons are quieter, so I take that time to finish up my own projects, socialize with other people in the office, or leave the office for a break.

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